Vancouver man involved in SK residential schools sex case: reports

Beauval Residential School in 1924

Beauval Residential School in 1924

An elderly man from Vancouver is facing sex assault charges stemming from his time spent as a dormitory supervisor at a residential school in Beauval, SK.

The reports seem to have conflicting information, such as the vital detail of his age. Anyways, here they are:

Global Saskatoon

Northern Pride (local independent)

I’ve had the opportunity to speak with several survivors from the Beauval Residential School and others. It has been a great source of pain for many First Nations people living in northwest Saskatchewan and all over Canada. Here’s an article I wrote last year about a couple of their experiences.

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Heritage sites in the Langara area, a look at our community’s past

26 SW Marine Drive

The Chrysler Building's brick wall is braced with metal poles while it undergoes restoration. Click for Flickr photo gallery

By BEN INGRAM


Every city is in some way adorned with a legacy of historic buildings, those fixtures of the past which provide a window into the character of previous days.

Vancouver is of course no different. Places like Casa Mia, a mansion built by bootleggers in the 1930s, offer more than just shelter from the storm. They give the city a story, one which can be shared with visitors and newborns alike.

While the rum-runner mansion, currently rumoured to be on the market for more than $10 million, offers an appealing story of high-class gangsters, all of Vancouver’s heritage buildings have a tale worth telling.

The Langara area is home to several heritage sites. They may not be as flashy as the others, but they each represent a worthy piece of Vancouver’s past.

The nuclear family

The Chrysler Building on 26 W Marine Drive is one such example.

It was built in 1956, a direct product of the post-war boom. Canadians were spending more than ever, families were growing and the consumer age rolled full-steam ahead.

All that stands now is the front wall, protected by a top-rating on Vancouver’s heritage register. The site has been rezoned to allow for the building of a retail complex centred around a large Canadian Tire store.

Marco Bordignon, project coordinator

Marco Bordignon points to the old wall's black support beam. The lead-filled beam will anchor the wall to the new building, he said.

Marco Bordignon is the project coordinator on the site.

“They’re using it like a showpiece,” Bordignon said of the intended design. The building’s remains will be fixed against the opening wall of the store, facing outwards towards Marine Drive. He said that a great deal of care is being taken to protect the wall while the new stores are constructed.

The new store was designed by architect John Cheung.

“Part of the agreement is to make sure we retain the wall, [but also] that we have to restore the wall,” Cheung said, speaking of his design for the retail giant. The wall suffers from damaged brickwork and needs supports to prevent it from collapsing while the new complex is constructed.

While the people who worked there didn’t have high status jobs or stories worth making a movie about, their legends are told just as much. The nuclear family and white-glowing television sets, when smoking was okay and letters had to be physically written.

Award-winning design

While a brick wall might not be much to look at, the Langara area is also home to sites that are protected because of the shear beauty of their design.

One example is the Unitarian Church on W 49th Avenue.

A natural wood interior welcomes light and perfected acoustics.

Reverend Steve Epperson knows all about it.

“You’ve got wood, you’ve got lots of light. He wanted to build it so you’d have that sense of inside being outside, bringing nature in,” Epperson said.

The building was designed by Wolfgang Gerson in 1964 with a careful ear towards acoustics. While serving primarily as a church, the building doubles as a highly regarded concert hall.

Reverend Steve Epperson outside the sanctuary

Epperson stands beside a plaque dedicating the building to its creator

So much has the building been praised for the brilliance of its design that it has also been given a top-rating on the heritage register.

Windows into the past

The Langara area is also home to sites that are valued because of their age.

Sir William Van Horne Elementary will be celebrating its centennial this year during the month of May. Built in 1911, the school continues to educate the children who grow up in our neighbourhood. Even at the age of 100, the building is a well-maintained window into the areas past.

Close to that is the C.G. Johnson house on W 58th Avenue. Built in 1912 by one of Vancouver’s wealthier individuals, it later became a nursing home in 1938. Like the school it stands well-preserved, an age-old building amongst freshly dry-walled suburban houses and sprawling retail outlets.

BC Soccer optimistic about Vancouver Whitecaps MLS debut

Proud fans watch the Whitecaps' first MLS victory. Photo by Rosie Tulips

The enthusiasm surrounding Saturday’s Whitecaps victory over Toronto FC has BC Soccer Association excited about the future of youth soccer in the province.

As a director of BC Soccer, Steve Allen said he expects the Whitecaps’ integration into Major League Soccer will boost interest in soccer for both parents and their children.

“In general we expect to see an increase in youth registration. BC Soccer’s programming has changed over the last year in anticipation of the MLS,” Allen said.

Many of the 23,000 screaming fans that witnessed Whitecaps star Eric Hassli score two goals on Saturday, leading the team to victory over Toronto FC, were parents and children.

“Those kinds of activities tend to generate new registrations in the youth game,” Allen said, adding that when the parents become interested, they’re much more likely to register their kids to play.

This February, BC Soccer announced the eight clubs comprising their new Premier League. Top-level talents in youth soccer will be recruited from multiple age ranges to participate in the first ‘mini-season’ this fall.

The league, which recently enlisted EA Sports as a major sponsor, begins its first full-season in March of 2012. BC Soccer’s Premier League will have youth competing on the national level.

“Our reorganization was to bring us in line with the rest of Canada,” Allen said.

Some adjustments

“BC’s in a very unique situation in that we can play soccer all year round. It’s also a double-edged sword because you get lousy weather, more injuries. Summer time, when we should be playing or training, we’re not.”

Like the Canucks, the Whitecaps sell 50/50 lottery tickets at their games and a significant portion is marked for youth programs. Allen said he also expects increased revenue from the Whitecaps to help development.

“More camps, academies and programs that people can take part in. There’s some revenue generation there,” Allen said. He added that many of the kids involved at this level will have their eyes set on a career in soccer that may include university, college, or even the Whitecaps themselves.

While the new league has been organized around the anticipation of the Whitecaps heading to MLS, Allen hopes the added interest in the sport will show at all levels of competitive soccer in BC.

Beyond simply raising interest in the sport, there are expectations that the Whitecaps will have other positive effects on the province.

Around $563 million has been injected into renovations at BC Place, the future home of the Whitecaps and BC Lions. With this, there is added hope that Vancouver will win its bid to secure the 2015 Women’s World Cup of Soccer.

Hope for growth

While increased revenues are expected by people like Allen to trickle down to the lower levels of soccer in the province, he said he also expects merchandise sales and tourism to have a positive effect on the local economy.

“It’s flying off the shelves right now,” Allen said of Whitecaps merchandise. “There’s a lot of [economic] activity that comes from these events.”

BC Soccer expects that games against Toronto, Portland and Seattle will generate the most tourism, with visitors loyal to these teams staying in hotels and enjoying Vancouver’s culture.

The general confidence in the future of the Whitecaps has also led to an all-star line up of sponsorships. Among the names secured before Saturday’s MLS debut are Bell Canada, Bank of Montreal, Electronic Arts and Kia Motors.

With all the investment, sponsorship and enthusiastic fans surrounding the Whitecaps’ ascendancy, it would seem that Vancouver has caught soccer fever.

“The reality is, when the Whitecaps started to look at [entering the MLS], they had other things in mind as well.”

Feature: How to make the perfect compost pile, a definitive guide

Two stakes and a net is all you need if you follow these easy steps

Here in Vancouver, 30 per cent of collected garbage is made of biodegradable materials. These materials can be easily composted, but are instead dumped into the trash. While the city has set its sights on a 70 per cent diversion rate by 2015 – meaning the goal is to have most of the waste avoid a landfill – it requires the willful participation of the population.

Constructing your own compost is actually an easy process, requiring very little expertise. Follow these simple instructions to put a dent in your waste contributions.

Read More

Hundreds of citizens pack city council for first Edgewater Casino hearing

A crowd gathers outside of the W 12 Avenue entrance to city hall

The corridors of Vancouver City Hall were packed tonight, as hundreds of people showed up to express their distaste over the proposed Edgewater Casino expansion.

Before being allowed into the building, protesters jammed the entrance waiting for the security lockdown to cease, a “standard procedure” according to councillor Andrea Reimer, who entered through the Broadway entrance.

While the anger could be felt from all directions, with various groups lobbing words like ‘greed’ and expressing a strong distaste for what they felt the proposal would mean for the city, a small group of casino workers stood off to the side, wondering why nobody wanted to hear their side of the story.

Edgewater employees

“They help me out a lot,” said Edgewater employee Elela Eremina. A Russian immigrant and 13 year casino employee, Eremina said she was recently diagnosed with cancer and that the company had been quite supportive of her needs.

Beside Eremina stood her friend and colleague Shelly Holden, a 38-year-old blackjack dealer that’s worked at Edgewater for over two years.

“It’s pretty heart breaking to see this many people so adamantly opposed to it,” she said, her eyes watering up indicating she was holding back tears.

“They’re making it more of an anger issue than it is.”

Holden said the critics of the development were ignoring the creation of jobs, expected to number some 1,900 full-time equivalent positions.

“Nobody still has a solid argument as to why [there should be] no casino.”

Gaming addiction

Holden pointed to GameSense representatives who are tasked with identifying problem gamblers, around 4.6 per cent of the population, and providing them with services to deal with their addictions.

“You go online and you don’t get that,” she said. “BCLC seems to be pretty much supporting online gambling and they’re forgetting about the people who actually need jobs.”

Those opposed certainly made their presence felt, with several large banners exclaiming opposition to the casino expansion. The group Vancouver Not Vegas, which distributed signs addressed to various councillors opposing the expansion, had collected over 2,800 signatures for its online petition by the time council proceedings began.

Opposition from an unlikely source

Among the 163 speakers in line to speak was Glyn Townson, spokesman for the BC Persons with AIDS Society.

“I think the politicians need to hear the issues around this that they might not be fully aware of,” he said. Townson expressed a degree of confidence in the mayor and council, but added that he worried about the transparency of gaming funds.

“They’re not giving the percentages they said they were going to in the first place … In the beginning where it was 50 per cent, now [it’s] 30 per cent,” he said.

Townson said that his group depends upon an annual dividend of $210,000 in order to finance much of their operations. While told there would be no cuts to that funding, he said he recently found out that the group will have to budget for $50,000 less.

Saying he had witnessed the effects first-hand of these type of cuts on social programming, like arts and athletics, Townson said his group wanted “A full counting of where that money is going.”

A crowd pleaser

While the highly contenious session of council got underway, the crowd became noticeably unsettled by 8:00 p.m. A drunken individual, who was seen consuming alcohol outside of the council chambers, walked up to the BC Pavilion Corporation speaker and interrupted his presentation.

Security officials asked the crowd if the man should be removed and the group answered with a resounding “Yes!”

It was, perhaps, the least contentious issue of the night.

Video: Vancouver tent city protest, Feb. 26, 2011

Check out the video section for mine and Celia Leung‘s coverage of last week’s 2011 Tent City protest. The morning of the action was a constant push-and-shove between activists and the security forces resisting them. Ultimately, the action fell apart as activists were refused the ability to set up their tents. The city has said housing remains a provincial matter and citing their plans to provide spaces for all of Vancouver’s homeless by 2015, denounced the demands of the group as unrealistic.

Click for Video Section